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The Johns Hopkins University

The Johns Hopkins University (commonly referred to as Johns Hopkins, JHU, or simply Hopkins) is a private research university in Baltimore, Maryland. Founded in 1876, the university was named after its first benefactor, the American entrepreneur, abolitionist, and philanthropist Johns Hopkins. His $7 million bequest—of which half financed the establishment of The Johns Hopkins Hospital—was the largest philanthropic gift in the history of the United States at the time. Daniel Coit Gilman, who was inaugurated as the institution's first president on February 22, 1876, led the university to revolutionize higher education in the U.S. by integrating teaching and research.

 

The first research university in the Western Hemisphere and one of the founding members of the American Association of Universities, Johns Hopkins has ranked among the world’s top universities throughout its history. The National Science Foundation has ranked the university #1 among U.S. academic institutions in total science, medical, and engineering research and development spending for 31 consecutive years Johns Hopkins is also ranked #12 in the U.S. News and World Report undergraduate program rankings for 2014 [10] and was also ranked 11th in the U.S. News and World Report Best Global University Rankings of 2014, outranking Princeton University, Yale University, University of Pennsylvania, and Cornell University.

 

Johns Hopkins is organized into ten divisions on campuses in Maryland and Washington, D.C. with international centers in Italy, China, and Singapore.[14] The two undergraduate divisions, the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences and the Whiting School of Engineering, are located on the Homewood campus in Baltimore's Charles Village neighborhood. The medical school, the nursing school, and the Bloomberg School of Public Health are located on the Medical Institutions campus in East Baltimore. The university also consists of the Peabody Institute, the Applied Physics Laboratory, the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies, the education school, the Carey Business School, and various other facilities.

 

History

 

The Johns Hopkins University opened in 1876, with the inauguration of its first president, Daniel Coit Gilman. "What are we aiming at?" Gilman asked in his installation address. "The encouragement of research ... and the advancement of individual scholars, who by their excellence will advance the sciences they pursue, and the society where they dwell."

 

The mission laid out by Gilman remains the university's mission today, summed up in a simple but powerful restatement of Gilman's own words:

 

 "Knowledge for the world."

 

What Gilman created was a research university, dedicated to advancing both students' knowledge and the state of human knowledge through research and scholarship. Gilman believed that teaching and research are interdependent, that success in one depends on success in the other. A modern university, he believed, must do both well. The realization of Gilman's philosophy at Johns Hopkins, and at other institutions that later attracted Johns Hopkins-trained scholars, revolutionized higher education in America, leading to the research university system as it exists today.

 

After more than 130 years, Johns Hopkins remains a world leader in both teaching and research. Eminent professors mentor top students in the arts and music, the humanities, the social and natural sciences, engineering, international studies, education, business and the health professions. Those same faculty members, and their research colleagues at the university's Applied Physics Laboratory, have each year since 1979 won Johns Hopkins more federal research and development funding than any other university.

The university has nine academic divisions and campuses throughout the Baltimore-Washington area. The Krieger School of Arts and Sciences, the Whiting School of Engineering and the School of Education are based at the Homewood campus in northern Baltimore. The schools of Medicine, Public Health, and Nursing share a campus in east Baltimore with The Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Carey Business School is located in Harbor East in downtown Baltimore. The Peabody Institute, a leading professional school of music, is located on Mount Vernon Place in downtown Baltimore. The Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies is located in Washington's Dupont Circle area.

The Applied Physics Laboratory is a division of the university co-equal to the nine schools, but with a non-academic, research-based mission. APL, located between Baltimore and Washington, supports national security and also pursues space science, exploration of the Solar System and other civilian research and development.

 

Johns Hopkins also has a campus near Rockville in Montgomery County, Md., and has academic facilities in Nanjing, China, and in Bologna, Italy. It maintains a network of continuing education facilities throughout the Baltimore-Washington region, including centers in downtown Baltimore, in downtown Washington and in Columbia.

When considered in partnership with its sister institution, the Johns Hopkins Hospital and Health System, the university is Maryland's largest employer and contributes more than $10 billion a year to the state's economy.

The mission of The Johns Hopkins University is to educate its students and cultivate their capacity for life-long learning, to foster independent and original research, and to bring the benefits of discovery to the world.

 

Ranking

 

In 2014, Hopkins was ranked 11th by the first U.S. News Global University Rankings.[60] At the undergraduate level, Johns Hopkins was ranked #12 among National Universities by U.S. News and World Report (USNWR). It is ranked #1 in the nation in the high school counselor reputation rankings.[62] The 2012 Academic Ranking of World Universities (ARWU) ranked Hopkins #17 internationally (#15 nationally) and 3rd in the world for Clinical Medicine and Pharmacy.[63] In 2010, Johns Hopkins ranked 13th in the Times Higher Education World University Rankings[64] and 16th in the 2011 QS World University Rankings.[65][66][67] Johns Hopkins also placed #2 in the 2010 University Ranking by Academic Performance (URAP),[68] #2 in the 2011 HEEACT – Performance Ranking of Scientific Papers for World Universities,[69] ranked #7 among Top Performing Schools according to the Faculty Scholarly Productivity Index (FSPI) in 2008,[70] and was listed #9 among research universities by the Center for Measuring University Performance in 2007.[

 

For medical and public health research U.S. News and World Report ranks the School of Medicine #2 and has consistently ranked the Bloomberg School of Public Health #1 in the nation. The School of Nursing was ranked #1 nationally among peer institutions. The Times Higher Education Supplement ranked Johns Hopkins University #3 in the world for biomedicine and life sciences. Hopkins ranks #1 nationally in receipt of federal research funds and the School of Medicine is #1 among medical schools in receipt of extramural awards from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Newsweek named Johns Hopkins as the "Hottest School for Pre-meds" in 2008. The Johns Hopkins Hospital was ranked as the top hospital in the United States for the eighteenth year in a row by the U.S. News and World Report annual ranking of American hospitals.

 

The university's graduate programs in the areas of Biological & Biomedical Sciences, Engineering (Biomedical, Electrical & Environmental), Human Development & Family Studies, Health Sciences, Humanities, Physical & Mathematical Sciences and International Affairs & Development all rank among the top-10 of their respective disciplines

 

Campus Life at Johns Hopkins

 

A campus isn't just a school. It's a small city, with rhythms and needs of its own.

What is it about a place that makes it truly special? At Johns Hopkins, it's a combination of wide, green, inviting spaces in the heart of a bustling city; impressive Georgian brick and white marble; and winding paths through gorgeous landscaping.

Johns Hopkins is an active and supportive community, filled with students of different viewpoints, different cultures, and different backgrounds. The thing that brings them all together is their desire to be here and to celebrate everything this place has to offer.

There's always something going on. Every week offers lectures, concerts, art and photography exhibitions, theater, movies, sports, volunteer opportunities, and whatever else anybody has an idea to do. You'll never run out of things to try.

There are at least 350 student groups and organizations on campus, although that number keeps expanding because students are encouraged to start new clubs to fit their interests - and they don't hesitate to do so! All Johns Hopkins student groups are governed and managed by students, and there is literally something for everybody.

To the left are links to services, web sites, calendars, libraries, campus facilities and other information that help turn our campuses into a thriving and welcoming home town. To the right, you can see a sampling of some of the many events that are happening right now at JHU.

 

Research

 

The opportunity to participate in important research is one of the distinguishing characteristics of Hopkins' undergraduate education. About 80 percent of undergraduates perform independent research, often alongside top researchers. n FY 2009, Johns Hopkins received $1.856 billion in federal research grants—more than any other US university.[9] Thirty-seven (37) Nobel Prize winners have been affiliated with the university as alumni or faculty members.

 

Installing a New Horizons Imager at the APL

 

Between 1999 and 2009, Johns Hopkins was among the most cited institutions in the world. It attracted nearly 1,222,166 citations and produced 54,022 papers under its name, ranking #3 globally (after Harvard University and the Max Planck Society) in the number of total citations published in Thomson Reuters-indexed journals over 22 fields in America.

 

In FY 2000, Johns Hopkins received $95.4 million in research grants from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), making it the leading recipient of NASA research and development funding.[92] In FY 2002, Hopkins became the first university to cross the $1 billion threshold on either list, recording $1.14 billion in total research and $1.023 billion in federally sponsored research. In FY 2008, Johns Hopkins University performed $1.68 billion in science, medical and engineering research, making it the leading U.S. academic institution in total R&D spending for the 30th year in a row, according to a National Science Foundation (NSF) ranking.[93] These totals include grants and expenditures of JHU's Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Maryland. The Johns Hopkins University also offers the "Center for Talented Youth" program—a nonprofit organization dedicated to identifying and developing the talents of the most promising K-12 grade students worldwide. As part of the Johns Hopkins University, the "Center for Talented Youth" or CTY helps fulfill the university's mission of preparing students to make significant future contributions to the world

 

 

Moto in English

 

The truth will set you free

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